Top 6 Amazing Pet Shrimp for the Freshwater Aquarium

»Posted by on Jul 16, 2021 in Education, Freshwater Fish | Comments Off on Top 6 Amazing Pet Shrimp for the Freshwater Aquarium

Top 6 Amazing Pet Shrimp for the Freshwater Aquarium Written by: Isha K. Shrimp are some of the coolest freshwater invertebrates, and they come in many different shapes and sizes. Here are some of the coolest pet shrimp ( all available at Absolutely Fish and Absolutely Fish Naturals! ) Dwarf Shrimp : These shrimp usually get around 1” and are very well suited for nano aquariums Neocaridina davidi (neos, skittle shrimp, rili shrimp, cherry shrimp) Neocaridina shrimp are the most available dwarf shrimp, and for good reason. These shrimp are much hardier than their caridina relatives, they happily live in tap water and can tolerate a wide range of water conditions. Neocaridina come in many colors, including goldenbacks, orange sunkist, blue dreams, red rili, red cherry, and blue jelly. Water Parameters Temperature : Best at 70-78F, survive 60-85FpH : 6.0 – 8.0KH : Prefer 0-8, survive most water conditionsGH : 4-14Ammonia/Nitrite : 0 (Not for cycling) Breeding Neocaridina shrimp breed in freshwater. The newborn shrimp are very small, so if you’re intending to breed these shrimps it’s best to keep them alone or with herbivorous fish like otocinclus. They will still breed when with other fish, just not as rapidly. All colors of neocaridina are the same species and a result of selective breeding. If two different neocaridina colors interbreed they will produce ‘wild type’ offspring that are a mix of black, brown, and clear. Caridina sp. Caridina shrimp are much more sensitive than neocaridina shrimp, but are considered more attractive by many. RODI water buffered to their water conditions is ideal. Caridina shrimp come in many different forms, all of which require different care. Tiger Caridina shrimp (tangerine tiger, black/red tiger, caridina baubalti) These shrimp are some of the hardiest caridina shrimp, and can do well in some tap water (RODI still preferred). They have black or red stripes on them and are more transparent than the other caridina species. Water conditions Temperature : 70-78FpH : 6.0 – 7.5KH : 0-6GH : 4-8Ammonia/Nitrite : 0 (Not for cycling) Bee Caridina shrimp (crystal shrimp, king kongs, blue bolts) These shrimp are the most prized dwarf shrimp, but are also the most sensitive. They have solid white on them accompanied by a red, black, or blue patterning. The difficulty of bee shrimp varies, with crystal shrimp being the easiest and king kong and galaxy shrimp being the hardest. Water conditions Temperature : 70-78FpH : 6.0 – 7.0KH : 0-4GH : 3-6Ammonia/Nitrite : 0 (Not for cycling) Breeding Both Tiger and Bee shrimp breed rapidly in freshwater. If different colored caridina shrimp mix, they form a shrimplet that is solid white with different patches or stripes of solid color. Caridina multidentada (Amano shrimp, Japonica shrimp) Amano shrimp are one of the best algae eaters for nano tanks. They get larger than the other dwarf shrimp at 2” (the size of a betta). They are usually clear with black/brown dots but some varieties have blue or green coloring on them. Water conditions Temperature : 70-78FpH : 6.0 – 7.5KH : prefers 0-10GH : prefers 4-14Ammonia/Nitrite : 0 (Not for cycling) Breeding These shrimp don’t breed in freshwater, and their young need to go through multiple salinities to develop properly. True amano shrimp won’t breed in a home aquarium. Palaemonetes paludosus (ghost shrimp) While ghost shrimp are mainly sold as feeders, they can still be wonderful pets. Ghost shrimp get up to 2” and while they aren’t good algae eaters, they’re very interesting to watch. Water conditions Temperature : 65-82FAmmonia/Nitrite : 0 (Not for cycling) Breeding Ghost shrimp are very easy to breed. Other popular shrimp : These shrimp get a little larger and can be housed with bigger fish Atyopsis moluccensis (Bamboo flower shrimp, Bamboo shrimp, Wood shrimp, Singapore flower shrimp) Bamboo flower shrimp get 3”, and are much hardier than dwarf shrimp. These shrimp are some of the few shrimp that can be in a tank with larger fish. Water Conditions Temperature : 70-78FpH : 7.0-7.5Ammonia/Nitrite : 0 (Not for cycling) Breeding Bamboo flower shrimplets need different salinities to develop, they have not been captive bred. Atya gabonensis (Atya Viper shrimp, Vampire shrimp, African Filter shrimp) Atya Viper shrimp are the biggest of the shrimp on this list at 4-5” and sometimes up to 6”! They’re known for their beautiful coloring which can range from a creamy white/brown color to vibrant blues and purples. They appreciate higher temperatures than most shrimp, which makes them good tankmates for rams and other high temperature fish. Water conditions Temperature : 75-85pH : 6.5 – 7.5Ammonia/Nitrite : 0 (Not for cycling) Breeding Atya Viper shrimplets need multiple salinities to properly...

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Controlling the Marine Reef Aquaria Pests Aiptasia pallida Sponsored by: Absolutely Fish Naturals

»Posted by on Mar 25, 2021 in Anna Mariano, Blog, Cedes Militante, Reef Aquaria | Comments Off on Controlling the Marine Reef Aquaria Pests Aiptasia pallida Sponsored by: Absolutely Fish Naturals

Controlling the Marine Reef Aquaria Pests Aiptasia pallida Sponsored by: Absolutely Fish Naturals

Controlling the Marine Reef Aquaria Pests Aiptasia pallida By: Anna Dominique G. Mariano It is well known that Aiptasia pallida, also referred to as glass anemones, are one of the most common pests found in saltwater aquaria, especially in reef tanks. It is quite easy for these anemones to infiltrate anyone’s tank or system; however, it is incredibly challenging to try to expel them as the conditions in a reef tank creates a perfect environment for A. pallida to thrive. These anemones also reproduce asexually through pedal reproduction, where the small regenerative portions are lost when it moves (Lehnert et al., 2012). This makes it futile to remove them manually as it can cause the unintentional spread of more glass anemones. Photo: Tropical Fish Hobbyist Magazine, James Fatherree A. pallida can be removed chemically. One method is to inject the anemone disk with hydrogen peroxide. It is effective in killing the pest; however, the downfall to this method is that it must be done carefully as hydrogen peroxide is not the safest for other invertebrates in the tank. Another safer chemical method is to use Aiptasia-X by Red Sea. Aiptasia-X can be injected at the anemone oral disk, and it causes the anemone to ingest the liquid while preventing it from retracting (redseafish.com). Afterwards, the anemone will implode preventing it from spreading. This is a great way to safely remove A. pallida, as Aiptasia-X is reef safe and will not affect water chemistry. Aiptasia-X is the perfect solution for anemones that have grown near coral polyps.  It is beneficial to combine both chemical and biological removal of these pests as it is easy to miss smaller glass anemones. One of the most popular invertebrates to add to home aquaria for the control of A. pallida is the peppermint shrimp (Lysmata sp.). Photo by Anna MarianoAbsolutely Fish Many aquarists have found success of removing A. pallida through the addition of peppermint shrimp into their tanks. Peppermint shrimp are also reef safe; however, they are also opportunistic feeders and may try to “steal” food from corals. The matted filefish (Acreichthys tomentosus) has also been known to eat A. pallida. Photo by Anna MarianoAbsolutely Fish The matted filefish is a great addition to a tank to rid it of glass anemones as they reach a max size of about 4 inches and are peaceful towards other fish. The do not specialize in only eating A. pallida and will consume pellets or frozen food. It may take some time before they develop a taste for the glass anemones in your tank, and in some rare cases some individuals will not even be interested eating the pest anemones. Another downside is that some hobbyists report that matted filefish may nip at corals. Another possible fish to control pest anemones in aquaria is the copperband butterfly (Chelmon rostratus). Photo by Anna MarianoAbsolutely Fish Copperband butterflies are beautiful fish that can potentially assist in consuming A. pallida; however, there are also many potential downsides in using this fish solely for pest control. In captivity, copperband butterflies are known to be finnicky eaters and it may take extra work to try to get them to eat any glass anemones. This also makes them known for being notoriously difficult to keep in home aquaria. There is also a risk of copperband butterflies nipping at other invertebrates such as tube worms, clams, or other anemones. An effective invertebrate to use to consume A. pallida are Berghia nudibranchs (Berghia stephanieae). These little nudibranchs are a peaceful invertebrate that will not harm any corals as they will only prey on A. pallida; however, once you run out of anemones in the tank berghia nudibranchs will die of starvation. It is also important to not directly place them on A.pallida as they can be harmed by anemone tentacles. These nudibranchs are also very small, so depending on tank size you may need to obtain multiple. Glass anemones are a pain to get rid of in saltwater aquaria, but through the use of both chemical and biological methods you can keep these pests at bay! Works Cited Lehnert, E.M., Burriesci, M.S., and Pringle, J.R. 2012. Developing the anemone Aiptasia as a tractable model for cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis: the transcriptome of       aposymbiotic A. pallida. BMC Genomics. 13(271). FOR MORE INFO VISIT:...

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Freshwater Ich Treatment by: Robert Dixon

»Posted by on Feb 8, 2019 in Cedes Militante, Conservation, Education, Freshwater Fish, Robert D, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Freshwater Ich Treatment by: Robert Dixon

Freshwater Ich Treatment  by: Robert Dixon   Ichthyophthirius multifiliis or freshwater ich as it is more commonly known is a common protozoan parasite that has plagued the freshwater aquariums of fishkeepers for decades. In that time many different cures and remedies have been suggested, tested and established for the public to use. Some of the more powerful treatments however are not the most ideal to use in certain situations. Some aquarists are apprehensive to use such potent chemicals in their tanks when they have some of the more sensitive fish. Others completely avoid these products for ethical reasons. There are alternatives for people caught in these situations. There are now numerous freshwater ich treatment products that use natural and botanical compounds which are not as harsh to sensitive fish and living tropical plants. Ichthyophthirius multifiliis or freshwater ich as it is more commonly known is a common protozoan parasite that has plagued the freshwater aquariums of fishkeepers for decades. In that time many different cures and remedies have been suggested, tested and established for the public to use. Some of the more powerful treatments however are not the most ideal to use in certain situations. Some aquarists are apprehensive to use such potent chemicals in their tanks when they have some of the more sensitive fish. Others completely avoid these products for ethical reasons. There are alternatives for people caught in these situations. There are now numerous freshwater ich treatment products that use natural and botanical compounds which are not as harsh to sensitive fish and living tropical plants.             One example is Prevent Ich and Ich Attack produced by Kordon. These are a preventative and curative treatment respectively that use botanical compounds such as naphthoquinones to treat ich. Acurel Knockout IP is another natural product that’s use all-natural oils to medicate ich and prevent further spread. This product also has Absorpotol which allows for the Knockout IP to be more readily absorbed by the fish and allow the fish to be treated faster. Another plant that has had its extracts used for freshwater ich remedies is garlic. Scientific research has proven the natural curing properties of garlic on ich. There are many products made using garlic extracts such as ingestible foo soaks. Lastly Melafix is an antimicrobial product that uses compounds from the Melaleuca genus, or more widely known as tea tees, to combat various bacterial infections and parasites including ich. The compounds eliminates “masking” bacteria which is used by ectoparasites such as Ich to prevent immune detection.             There are many different ways to go about treating ich. Sometimes using more powerful chemical products is necessary for particularly virile cases. Other times softer and more natural products are needed for aquariums with fish that are easily susceptible to strong chemicals. What is important is being informed about all the options available for treatment and what is best for your aquarium. It is ideal for most aquarists to use natural products such as botanicals. There are a variety of these products available to choose from at Absolutely Fish. Also, please come into the shop and ask about our Aquanats Boxes. They are a great way to sample natural and medicinal care...

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Amyloodinium ocellatum – a.k.a Oodinium a.k.a. Marine Velvet Disease

»Posted by on Jan 11, 2019 in Blog, Cedes Militante, Conservation, Education, Heather, News, Saltwater Fish | Comments Off on Amyloodinium ocellatum – a.k.a Oodinium a.k.a. Marine Velvet Disease

Amyloodinium ocellatum – a.k.a Oodinium a.k.a. Marine Velvet Disease If someone were to ask me what the most deadly marine disease was, one of the first things that come to mind would be Marine Velvet. Unfortunately it is not uncommon, and the dinoflagellate infestation can frequently be found in newly imported fish. The A. ocellatum parasite responsible for premature fish loss is actually an algal protozoan and closely related to the dinoflagellates that cause red tides. ocellatum can completely wipe out an entire aquarium in the right conditions: poor nutrition, low water quality, improper life support equipment, and other stressors.     Life cycle of “Oodinium”: Life cycle is typically 6-12 (but as long as 28) days depending on temperature. Trophont stage- the only time you can see the parasite, nonmotile and hosting a fish absorbing nutrients for reproduction Encysted stage- a.k.a tomont or palmella, the parasite divides while still on the fish. Incubation period can be 3-6 days. Dinospore stage- newly hatched parasites emerge from cysts and are free swimming, looking for new hosts   Symptoms Marine Velvet is not easy to spot. TIP: make sure to look at thin, transparent areas of your fish and try to view these areas at an angle to best see affected areas. First signs of infection include rapid respiration (the gills are typically attacked first). A classic infestation has been described as a dusting of powdered sugar or a foggy or faded area on the fish’s body and can be accompanied by cloudy eyes and fins. Fins may appear clamped and fish may stop eating. You may see the fish flashing or scraping its body against décor or the substrate. Severe infestations look velvety in texture, thus the name. In these instances you will also see sloughing off of the protective slime coat. Death can occur in as little as 12 hours, without any outward appearance if the gills are severely damaged by the parasite. It has even been known to colonize the guts or esophagi of many fishes, making it difficult to spot and control.   Treatments Prevention! Especially in reef tanks, as most medications can kill coral and live rock! Have the right equipment to house your fish, proper UV sterilizer, feed a nutritious diet, quarantine new fish, be educated and ask questions when selecting fish for your tank, etc. This disease can happen so fast, that sometimes aquarists loose their whole tank in a day or two and never saw anything wrong. Repeated fresh water baths dosed with quick cure or formalin may dislodge some of the trophants on the fish (about 10-15 minutes). Fish must be caught quickly or stress of netting can cause disease to worsen. Treatment with copper sulfate (i.e. Cupramine) for 21-30 days. Chloroquine phosphate treatment could be used. Reef safe medications, though much weaker include Rally or Hypercure. Antiparasitic foods and garlic additives may also help if the fish is eating. Monitored hyposalinity may enhance effectiveness of treatments (1.010-1.013). Increasing temperature will increase reproduction rate of parasite and shorten life cycle for decreased treatment time, however, the fish’s metabolic rate and demand for oxygen also increases. If you think you might be noticing signs of Oodinium in your home aquarium, stop in to see one of our marine certified aquarists to diagnose and discuss your situation. We are experienced with this pathogen and would be happy to help you prevent and eradicate it!   Cool side note: A quick and immediate drop in salinity has dramatically increased effectiveness in controlling “Oodinium”. The parasite has semipermeable membranes and cannot control osmosis. They begin to absorb water as the cells try to equalize osmotic pressure with the change. Eventually, most strains of Amyloodinium pop like fish bags filled with too much air (in this case...

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Todd’s Top 5 Predatory Fish for a Marine Aquarium

»Posted by on Dec 21, 2018 in Blog, Cedes Militante, Conservation, Saltwater Fish, Todd F | Comments Off on Todd’s Top 5 Predatory Fish for a Marine Aquarium

Todd’s Top 5 Predatory Fish for a Marine Aquarium What do you think of when you hear the word predatory? First thing in my mind, is a great white shark or an apex predator hunting its food source, but is there any animal which is not predatory, I think not. I have listed my five top predatory marine fish which are available to aquarists. These are no hard to find specimens on my list. Each fish has been chosen for a particular reason. Each are predatory in their own right, but are spread apart by huge differences. So here we go: 5. Miniatus Grouper (Cephalopholis miniata)- No list would be complete without a grouper and what would be better than a fire engine red, electric blue dotted miniatus. This is one of the most striking groupers you can look at. Ranging to a max length of 15”, it will eat anything it can fit in its mouth and has a bottomless pit for a stomach. A miniatus grouper is a great pick for an aggressive, large fish aquarium, but not a peaceful reef aquarium. 4. Blueline Neon Goby (Elactinus oceanops)- Who says a predator has to be a big fish with gnarly teeth. A blueline neon goby is an absolute beast on taking care of parasites on their fellow tank mates. They only grow to about an inch and eat all prepared foods you can give. A bonus to these gobies is they live, unlike a cleaner wrasse which is temporary. These gobies do come in a couple other colors such as yellow and a hybrid teal. 3. Kleinii Butterfly (Chaetodon kleinii)- Do you have aiptasia in your reef tank? Tired of injecting each one with aiptasia x? Well, try a kleinii butterfly. An alternative to a copperband butterfly, kleiniis are a great choice to rid your reef of aiptasia. They eat all prepared foods as well and are very hardy. The one thing to keep in mind is it is still a butterfly. They may still go after your prized zooanthid colony or torch coral once the aiptasia is gone. 2. Harlequin Tusk (Choerodon fasciatus)- I can’t think of any big fish tank not having a harlequin tusk. How can you deny the bright orange, red bars with gnarly blue teeth. They are a show piece for a tank with larger fish and no mobile invertebrates. Harlequin tusks are one of most popular marine fish many aquarists want to keep. They are a hardy species which eat larger prepared foods and grow to a max length of 12”     1. Volitan Lionfish (Pterois volitans)- One of the most exotic marine fish you can buy. The long pectoral fins and striped body makes the lionfish one of the most recognizable fish you will see. These fish grow to 15” and can pack a wallop with their venomous dorsal spines. Volitan lionfish will eat anything smaller than most of its body. They were primarily from the Pacific Ocean but have become a nuisance in the Atlantic. Their appetite is voracious which makes for a bad environmental impact where they are not kept in check by a larger predator. So if you are looking for a fish for your predator tank or just the right predator for the job, hopefully one of these fish will fit your needs. All of these species mentioned above can be found in stock at Absolutely Fish. Please feel free to contact us at Absolutleyfish@yahoo.com or at 973-365-0200if you have any questions or recommendations for your...

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