Quarantine Tank – A Home Aquarium Life-Saver!

»Posted by on Feb 27, 2018 in Blog, Steph | Comments Off on Quarantine Tank – A Home Aquarium Life-Saver!

Quarantine Tank – A Home Aquarium Life-Saver! by Stephanie Lamprea     What is a Quarantine Tank? A Quarantine Tank is a separate home aquarium that houses and acclimates new fishes or corals for a period of time before inserting them into your display tank. It is the perfect environment to observe new livestock for any diseases/infections and, if necessary, to properly heal your new livestock back to health! This process also prevents the possibilities of adding disease/infection to your display tank and infecting your currently healthy fish. EQUIPMENT: The items you need to setup a quarantine are a tank, glass top, filter, heater, standard fluorescent light, and some PVC pipes (or plastic plants and decorations) to provide atmosphere and hiding places for your new fishes. TANK SIZE is important and depends on what fish are being introduced. In a quarantine tank, the height is not as important as the surface area of the tank. For small fish we recommend a 20 long, for medium size fish a 30 long, and for large fish 40 breeder tank.     HOW LONG TO QUARANTINE? When introducing a new fish or coral, we recommend a quarantine process of minimum 2 to 4 weeks. This period provides you ample time to observe your livestock – is your fish eating? Any signs of sickness? Any abnormal behavior? If any of these signs come up, then you can properly medicate your tank. If you have any questions on medications or treatments, feel free to call the store and talk to any of our knowledgeable aquarists! WATER CHANGES: We recommend you test the water levels of your tank daily, and perform weekly water changes. Keep in mind that if there is medication in the tank at the time of a water change, you need to put in a partial re-dose of the medication to balance your tank out. Tip: Keep water parameters the same as your display so that acclimation goes smoothly. When concluding your quarantine session, properly acclimate the fish/coral from quarantine into display with either the Bag Method or Drip Method. If you plan on adding more livestock after this, it’s a good idea to put some small fish in the quarantine to keep the biological process going, such as damsels or clownfish. You can keep these in your quarantine, or eventually add them to your display, but it’s a safe way to keep the culture of the tank stable and prevent spikes in the nitrogen cycle when you decide to purchase a new fish. ALTERNATIVES: In the aquarium hobby, we highly, highly recommend having a quarantine tank setup to ensure a healthy environment for your aquatic pets. If a quarantine system is not an option for you, an alternative method within the acclimation of your fish can be a HydroPlex Dip. HydroPlex is a product we sell at our store that can be dosed at the end of drip acclimation for 10 minutes before putting your fish into the display tank. There is also the option of monitoring your desired fish in the store for a week before purchasing. We offer at our store a 7 day hold policy, in which a customer will pay for a fish in full and we will hold it to monitor its health and behavior before the customer introduces the fish into a new tank.     At Absolutely Fish, our display tanks are regularly cleaned and maintained, and additionally the tanks are run with Cupramine, a copper treatment for external parasites. We utilize oversized Fractionation, UV irradiation, “Zuppo filtration”, and ozone. But no matter where you purchase your aquarium livestock and needs, we highly recommend setting up a quarantine tank to prevent and unwanted diseases or infections. It really can be a home aquarium life-saver! (photos courtesy of Absolutely...

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Fish Family Spotlight: Hawkfish

»Posted by on Jan 3, 2018 in Blog, Steph | Comments Off on Fish Family Spotlight: Hawkfish

Fish Family Spotlight: Hawkfish written by Stephanie Lamprea   So, you have your new saltwater tank, you’ve properly cycled it, and you’re now looking for fish. What are good options for a beginner saltwater aquarium? There are lots of great fish for this scenario, but in this article I’d like to talk about one particular (and my personal favorite) fish family – Hawkfish!      From left to right: Longnose hawk, Flame hawk, Falco hawk   There are 12 genuses and 33 species of hawkfish that make up the Cirrhitidae family, and they are distributed predominantly within the Indo-Pacific region. Hawkfish share many physical features with the venomous Scorpaenidae family! Fortunately hawkfish themselves are not venomous, but their fringe aesthetic and crazy colors make them impressive. Hawkfish are also great for beginners in the salt water game! Many hawkfish seen in aquariums and pet stores remain small (about 3 to 4 inches). Because hawkfish do not have swim bladders, they perch on rocks and coral, and the way they move around the tank (either through small hops or effortful linear swimming) is really fun to watch in comparison to other tank mates. Just watch them as their eyes dart vigorously as they scavenge for food, and when they do swim, it is in a swooping circular motion like that of a hawk.   My hawkfish at home – his name is Oddyseus.   Hawkfish are reef-safe (though they also do well in FOWLR tanks), and they are extremely hardy and easy to care for. Their diet encompasses a variety of meaty foods that are dry (like pellets or flakes), and frozen or live (like brine shrimp). For this reason, small shrimp may not make good tank mates with a hawkfish, along with some smaller bottom dwellers like species of gobies or blennies. However, hawkfish thrive in a peaceful/semi-aggressive environment. In my tank at home (75 gallon FOWLR), my hawkfish is housed with clowns, an extremely petty royal gramma, a firefish, and a school of blue chromis, and everyone gets along just fine. Normally there should be one hawkfish only per tank, but there are cases where hawkfish have paired off and hosted a hard coral, or harems of hawkfish have been formed with a dominant male. Hawkfish are hermaphroditic and adapt their gender to their surroundings.   Some hawkfish artwork we made at home   To sum this up, hawkfish are hardcore and pretty much great fish for any saltwater tank, reef or FOWLR. I can say that my hawkfish has enriched my love for the aquarium hobby, so for saltwater enthusiasts out there, stop by your favorite local fish store (Absolutely Fish!) and ask about any of our hawkfish species we...

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